PDA

View Full Version : network vs network-remotefs



ashbyj
25-Jun-2012, 20:15
What is the difference between these two services? I see the description, but I don't fully understand. Is network-remotefs for wireless devices? Or for NFS-dedicated NICs or something?

/etc/init.d/network



# Description: Configure the localfs depending network interfaces
# and set up routing


/etc/init.d/network-remotefs



# Description: Configure the remote-fs depending network interfaces as
# Wireless and set up routing or start the NetworkManager

Jim Henderson
25-Jun-2012, 20:26
On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 19:24:01 +0000, ashbyj wrote:

> network-remotefs

remotefs = Remote File System.

Network mounted filesystems can't start until the network interfaces have
started. This init script does that. :)

Jim
--
Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
Novell Knowledge Partner

ashbyj
25-Jun-2012, 20:43
Thanks for the reply Jim. Why isn't the /etc/init.d/network script sufficient for bringing up all network devices though?

Jim Henderson
25-Jun-2012, 22:33
On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 19:44:02 +0000, ashbyj wrote:

> Thanks for the reply Jim. Why isn't the /etc/init.d/network script
> sufficient for bringing up all network devices though?

It is, and it does. eth0/wifi/etc are network devices. Network
filesystems aren't.

But especially when a boot process uses asynchronous methods to get
things started more quickly, it's easier to track the dependencies using
separate scripts for the network filesystems from the network devices
themselves.

In the case of wireless interfaces in particular, if you're using
NetworkManager (which I wouldn't on a server anyways), the GUI has to
start up before the remote filesystems can be mounted.

Jim

--
Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
Novell Knowledge Partner

ashbyj
26-Jun-2012, 16:03
It is, and it does. eth0/wifi/etc are network devices. Network
filesystems aren't.

But especially when a boot process uses asynchronous methods to get
things started more quickly, it's easier to track the dependencies using
separate scripts for the network filesystems from the network devices
themselves.


Whats the difference between /etc/init.d/nfs and network-remotefs then? nfs handles starting up all the nfs client services after the network is up and then mounts all the nfs shares in fstab. Sorry for not grasping this...

Jim Henderson
26-Jun-2012, 20:46
On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 15:04:02 +0000, ashbyj wrote:

> Whats the difference between /etc/init.d/nfs and network-remotefs then?
> nfs handles starting up all the nfs client services after the network is
> up and then mounts all the nfs shares in fstab. Sorry for not grasping
> this...

That's OK, it's not actually all that clear to me either, the more I look
at the scripts.

It seems that "network" is responsible for starting/stopping the network
services.

"network-remotefs" actually just calls the network script with some
additional parameters. All the logic is actually in the network script.

In the 'network' script, I see the following comment on my openSUSE 12.1
system:

# Under systemd, NetworkManager is started via its
# own .service file, thus never while localfs is set.
# Otherwise, NetworkManager will be started later via
# network-remotefs init script (it is installed in
# /usr, thus depends on already started remotefs).

Let me see if I can find more info about this.

Jim
--
Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
Novell Knowledge Partner