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GofBorg
03-Aug-2012, 16:30
I frequent a number of different forums. One of them recently converted
theirs to now use FB/Yahoo etc login accounts to allow 'posting'. The forum
was famous for its legendary threads that would stretch on for pages at a
time. Since the change, average thread length is 4...posts, not pages. Too
bad, there were many good conversations in there, now silenced.

kgroneman
03-Aug-2012, 18:32
I don't use my Facebook account to login anywhere by FB. I just don't
want to give FB that much access to my data and browsing habits. YMMV.
Is it just these sites not wanting to develop/use their own login
system? All the sites that I've seen that do this still have a link to
login outside of FB.

--
Kim - 8/3/2012 11:29:44 AM

Massimo Rosen
03-Aug-2012, 18:40
On 03.08.2012 19:32, kgroneman wrote:
> I don't use my Facebook account to login anywhere by FB. I just don't
> want to give FB that much access to my data and browsing habits.

Well, then you better not browse anywhere else with the same browser
you're using to access facebook.

Just sayin'

CU,
--
Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de

kgroneman
03-Aug-2012, 18:51
Well, I didn't pay for Facebook, yet still use it...and I didn't pay
for my browser, and still use it, so I guess I get what I paid for and
deserve what I get for doing so. I just act as prudently as I feel I
reasonably can/want to.

--
Kim - 8/3/2012 11:46:17 AM

GofBorg
03-Aug-2012, 19:13
> I don't use my Facebook account to login anywhere by FB. I just don't
> want to give FB that much access to my data and browsing habits. YMMV.
> Is it just these sites not wanting to develop/use their own login
> system? All the sites that I've seen that do this still have a link to
> login outside of FB.

Nope, they used to have their own login system, but it's no longer an option
to use it.

Massimo Rosen
04-Aug-2012, 09:36
On 03.08.2012 19:51, kgroneman wrote:
> Well, I didn't pay for Facebook, yet still use it...and I didn't pay
> for my browser, and still use it, so I guess I get what I paid for and
> deserve what I get for doing so. I just act as prudently as I feel I
> reasonably can/want to.
>
Yeah, but logging in or not to other sites using facebook credentials
really makes no difference to your prudence. Gazillions of sites today
will have facebook links or code embedded in their sites, and if you
visit those with the same browser you're logged into facebook, facebook
*will* know you visited them. So you can as well login to them using
facebook, it makes no difference.

If you don't want facebook to know where you surf to, you *must* use a
separate browser instance for facebook, or use a browser that has the
ability to open a private browsing tab.

CU,
--
Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de

Susan
05-Aug-2012, 17:51
> Is it just these sites not wanting to develop/use their own login
> system?

They're trying to make it easier for people to access their site.
Instead of having to create a login, you can just login with one of
your existing social networking logins.

That's just a guess though, because none of the sites I access don't
allow you to create your own login, if you prefer to do so. : )

--
Susan
Novell Community Chat Moderator

http://forums.novell.com/faq.php?faq=novfor#faq_rules
http://www.ncci.org NCCIrregulars Web Site
https://www.facebook.com/groups/NCCIrregulars

Please read the following before posting in here:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/27zopdy

unsigned
06-Aug-2012, 14:55
But that also works for pretty much any website you visit, eg: google,
bing, yahoo. The concept is just not unique to FB.

The difference is that by logging in to third party sites with Facebook
creds, you give that entity full access to your profile.

Facebook (or other social media) knowing what sites you visit and giving
access to your profile to each site you log in to with FB creds are kind
of different. I mean, if you are a FB user, you have already "shared" a
good part of your private life with FB itself, browsing history is kind
of a drop in the bucket.

However, giving <insert random corp here> access to *all* of my FB data
just to get the coupon code, cool flash game or access to a contest
seems like a poor trade.


On 8/4/2012 3:36 AM, Massimo Rosen wrote:
>>
> Yeah, but logging in or not to other sites using facebook credentials
> really makes no difference to your prudence. Gazillions of sites today
> will have facebook links or code embedded in their sites, and if you
> visit those with the same browser you're logged into facebook, facebook
> *will* know you visited them. So you can as well login to them using
> facebook, it makes no difference.
>

Massimo Rosen
06-Aug-2012, 23:50
On 06.08.2012 15:55, unsigned wrote:
> But that also works for pretty much any website you visit, eg: google,
> bing, yahoo. The concept is just not unique to FB.

Not exactly, no. And *by far* not so widespread.

> The difference is that by logging in to third party sites with Facebook
> creds, you give that entity full access to your profile.

Again, nope.

> Facebook (or other social media) knowing what sites you visit and giving
> access to your profile to each site you log in to with FB creds are kind
> of different. I mean, if you are a FB user, you have already "shared" a
> good part of your private life with FB itself, browsing history is kind
> of a drop in the bucket.

Well, I sort of disagree. Quite strongly actually. I do know very
precisely what I want to share on (with) facebook, and what not. The
webpages I use during the day most definitely is none of facebooks or
anybody elses business, unless *I* want them to know.

> However, giving <insert random corp here> access to *all* of my FB data
> just to get the coupon code, cool flash game or access to a contest
> seems like a poor trade.

Which you don't. Facebook just acts as an identity provider, at no point
does the page you login to with your FB account gain *any* access to any
of your FB data.

CU,
--
Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de

unsigned
07-Aug-2012, 15:41
On 8/6/2012 5:50 PM, Massimo Rosen wrote:
> On 06.08.2012 15:55, unsigned wrote:
>> But that also works for pretty much any website you visit, eg: google,
>> bing, yahoo. The concept is just not unique to FB.
>
> Not exactly, no. And *by far* not so widespread.

Ever heard of this?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Not_Track

Or this?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Analytics

I'll throw this op-ed in for tin-foil hat good measure.
http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/02/secure-your-browser-add-ons-to-stop-web-tracking/

>
>> The difference is that by logging in to third party sites with Facebook
>> creds, you give that entity full access to your profile.
>
> Again, nope.
>


Depending on the FB account's privacy settings, I strongly disagree.

Direct from FB, http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=229348490415842

How does privacy work with sites using Facebook Login?
When you connect or login to a website with your Facebook account, it
can access information you’ve added on Facebook in order to provide a
social and personalized experience on the site. The Facebook Platform
Policies restrict how these sites can access and use this information.


>> Facebook (or other social media) knowing what sites you visit and giving
>> access to your profile to each site you log in to with FB creds are kind
>> of different. I mean, if you are a FB user, you have already "shared" a
>> good part of your private life with FB itself, browsing history is kind
>> of a drop in the bucket.
>
> Well, I sort of disagree. Quite strongly actually. I do know very
> precisely what I want to share on (with) facebook, and what not. The
> webpages I use during the day most definitely is none of facebooks or
> anybody elses business, unless *I* want them to know.
>

Totally subjective. I do see your point, though I think you missed mine.
Browsing history is already a fairly public thing (it is not a practical
concept to surf the web in exclusively https), opposed to what folks
commonly put on FB.

>> However, giving <insert random corp here> access to *all* of my FB data
>> just to get the coupon code, cool flash game or access to a contest
>> seems like a poor trade.
>
> Which you don't. Facebook just acts as an identity provider, at no point
> does the page you login to with your FB account gain *any* access to any
> of your FB data.

See above, Please read the the login and connect privacy pages, it
states right on them that the entity will gain access to the FB users
profile. Definitely more than "*any*" access, I don't understand how
this can be disputed.

For example:

From the pinterist site (http://pinterest.com/about/privacy/):

"We collect information when you register to join Pinterest by logging
into an account that you already have with certain third-party social
networking sites (“SNS”) (including, but not limited to, Facebook and
Twitter) via our Service. For example, our Service allows you to create
an account and login to the Service using your Facebook account
credentials through Facebook Connect. If you are not currently
registered as a User on the Service and you click on “Sign in Using
Facebook,” you will first be asked to enter your Facebook credentials
and then be given the option to register and join Pinterest."


<snip>

"For example, by using Facebook Connect, you are allowing Pinterest to
access the Personal Information in your Facebook account pursuant to the
Facebook Terms of Use regarding your use of the Service via Facebook.
We use your Personal Information (in some cases, in conjunction with
your “Non-Identifying Information,” see below) to provide the Service to
you."

>
> CU,

Massimo Rosen
07-Aug-2012, 16:24
On 07.08.2012 16:41, unsigned wrote:
>
> Ever heard of this?
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Not_Track
>
> Or this?
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Analytics

Of course. Google Analytics (and every other remotely popular tracking
service like eloqua, 1O7.net and the like are totally blocked here.

*But*, there is a huge difference: These trackers may recognize me again
when I come back, and can even track my web usage to some extend.

But they do not regularly know *who exactly* I am. They know I'm
#1234566789, but not that I'm Massimo Rosen. Facebook knows my real
Identity and connects it with that data.
> Depending on the FB account's privacy settings, I strongly disagree.
>
> Direct from FB, http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=229348490415842

You still misread that. The website you login to does *not* get access
to your data. It all works within the facebook domain. You can not setup
a website with facebook login, and through that way gain access to any
data (other the public one which is used to identify me) in my facebook
account.

From the same page:

Quote:
"What information does a website get about me via the registration tool?
Expand All · Share
What information does a website get about me via the registration tool?
The website will only get information you choose to share with it. Any
information being requested will be clearly shown to you so you can
decide to share the information to register for the site or not. "

a.
>
> See above, Please read the the login and connect privacy pages, it
> states right on them that the entity will gain access to the FB users
> profile.

Sorry, but no. I can't even remotely fathom where you read that.

> "We collect information when you register to join Pinterest by logging
> into an account that you already have with certain third-party social
> networking sites (“SNS”) (including, but not limited to, Facebook and
> Twitter) via our Service. For example, our Service allows you to create
> an account and login to the Service using your Facebook account
> credentials through Facebook Connect. If you are not currently
> registered as a User on the Service and you click on “Sign in Using
> Facebook,” you will first be asked to enter your Facebook credentials
> and then be given the option to register and join Pinterest."

And where exactly does it state that they actually gain access to any
non-public Facebook data?

> "For example, by using Facebook Connect, you are allowing Pinterest to
> access the Personal Information in your Facebook account pursuant to the
> Facebook Terms of Use regarding your use of the Service via Facebook.

Right. The *public* information shared with everybody anyways. That's an
obvious necessity to identify you. Everybody can see that anyways.

CU,
--
Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de