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animati
11-Oct-2012, 20:55
Hi,
I trying to install SLES 11 SP2 in a PowerEdge DELL T310. The server has 3 x 2TB HD's with PERC H700 RAID 5 witch give me working 4TB of drive.

But I can't create a partition larger than 2TB. Is there a way to create a partition larger than 2TB?

malcolmlewis
11-Oct-2012, 21:24
Hi
Are you using 4K sectors?

Have a read through here as well;
http://www.novell.com/linux/releasenotes/x86_64/SUSE-SLES/11-SP2/

cjcox
12-Oct-2012, 00:25
On 10/11/2012 03:04 PM, animati wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I trying to install SLES 11 SP2 in a PowerEdge DELL T310. The server
> has 3 x 2TB HD's with PERC H700 RAID 5 witch give me working 4TB of
> drive.
>
> But I can't create a partition larger than 2TB. Is there a way to
> create a partition larger than 2TB?
>
>

The abstraction of choice for me is to use LVM.

So.. if the drive were, let's say /dev/sdb...

pvcreate /dev/sdb

vgcreate myvg /dev/sdb

lvcreate -l 100%VG -n mylv myvg

and then put your filesystem on /dev/myvg/mylv

No partitions needed.

animati
15-Oct-2012, 03:05
I'm using the normal DELL PERC H700 RAID 5 sectors.
I read the link you sent but didn't solve.

animati
15-Oct-2012, 03:07
I can't use LVM.
I just need to create a partition larger than 2TB for /home
The problem I described is in the suse installation screen when creating partitions...

animati
15-Oct-2012, 19:24
I had to create the partitions using ubuntu live CD and choosing GPT format partitions.
Is there a way to do that using SLES 11 SP2 installation? I don't think so.

animati
15-Oct-2012, 19:53
Work creating partitions with ubuntu live CD but didn't work the SUSE linux.

KBOYLE
16-Oct-2012, 04:11
Is there a way to create a partition larger than 2TB?

Have you checked the Documentation?
https://www.suse.com/documentation/sles11/

This is from the Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP2 Storage Administration Guide:

1.4. Large File Support in Linux¶ (https://www.suse.com/documentation/sles11/singlehtml/stor_admin/stor_admin.html#sec_filesystems_lfs)

Originally, Linux supported a maximum file size of 2 GB (231 bytes). Currently all of our standard file systems have LFS (large file support), which gives a maximum file size of 263 bytes in theory. The numbers given in the following table assume that the file systems are using 4 KiB block size. When using different block sizes, the results are different, but 4 KiB reflects the most common standard.


Table 1.2. Maximum Sizes of Files and File Systems (On-Disk Format)¶ (https://www.suse.com/documentation/sles11/singlehtml/stor_admin/stor_admin.html#tab.maxsize)


File System (4 KiB Block Size)
Maximum File Size
Maximum File System Size


BtrFS
16 EiB
16 EiB


Ext2 or Ext3
2 TiB
16 TiB


OCFS2 (available in the High Availability Extension)
4 PiB
4 PiB


ReiserFS v3
2 TiB
16 TiB


XFS
8 EiB
8 EiB


NFSv2 (client side)
2 GiB
8 EiB


NFSv3 (client side)
8 EiB
8 EiB



So, the short answer to your question is yes! I don't know what you are doing that is causing this issue for you but perhaps you can find out from the documentation.