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MelD
25-Feb-2016, 18:30
Hi,

My system is Suse Linux 11 PL3.

I need to enlarge my file system /dev/sdb1.

In my VM I enlarged /dev/sdb from 200GB to 300GB.

I went in to the YAST expert partitioner and tried to resize /dev/sdb1 to the new maximum. The partitioner can see the the additional storage.

But I got a message that says I need to unmount the file system.

I tried doing this using both Yast and umount but both times got a message that the system was in use.

What is the best way to get this filesystem resized?


I have read about changing the kernel parameters to boot in single user mode. I am a little wary of this because I don't want to end up with a problem booting. If this is the correct approach please provide and example of the change to make. But I have also read that the filesystem cannot be enlarged while the system is running at all.


One suggestion was that I would need to boot from ISO or CD to achieve this resize. If so how can I make or obtain a bootable ISO and how would it work?

Thanks for any help.

Mel

ab
25-Feb-2016, 22:10
On 02/25/2016 10:34 AM, MelD wrote:
>
> My system is Suse Linux 11 PL3.

Does 'PL3' mean 'SP3'? Service or Support Pack? Also, is it safe to
assume this is SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 11? I am guessing so,
as this is a SLES-focused forum.

> I need to enlarge my file system /dev/sdb1.
>
> In my VM I enlarged /dev/sdb from 200GB to 300GB.
>
> I went in to the YAST expert partitioner and tried to resize /dev/sdb1
> to the new maximum. The partitioner can see the the additional storage.
>
> But I got a message that says I need to unmount the file system.
>
> I tried doing this using both Yast and umount but both times got a
> message that the system was in use.
>
> What is the best way to get this filesystem resized?

First, get it not-used so you can unmount it. I do not see anywhere that
you mentioned where this filesystem is mounted. Depending on where it is,
and what is using it, this could be easy to do without rebooting, or it
may require booting into single-user mode, or it may require using
bootable rescue media (or equivalent) so that you can keep everything that
would use it from using it.

> I have read about changing the kernel parameters to boot in single user
> mode. I am a little wary of this because I don't want to end up with a
> problem booting. If this is the correct approach please provide and
> example of the change to make. But I have also read that the filesystem
> cannot be enlarged while the system is running at all.

No need to change them; at the Grub menu where you choose what to boot,
just type 1 (numeral one) which will show up in the line at the bottom of
the screen, and then press [Enter] to boot into runlevel 1. It will only
apply for this boot. Another option is you can type 'init=/bin/bash' to
get even lower-levels, but you probably do not want that quite yet, and
unless you feel comfortable with mounting things from nothing, probably
better to just use the external bootable media.

> One suggestion was that I would need to boot from ISO or CD to achieve
> this resize. If so how can I make or obtain a bootable ISO and how would
> it work?

If you opt for this, which should work regardless, just put in the install
media (for example) and choose a Rescue System option. You're not
rescuing your system of course, but Rescue System is just meant to give
you a bootable system from which you can rescue a system, or do something
else that is easier when booting from something other than your hard
drive. If you use PXE for installs, you could also PXE-boot a system.

Install media for SLES, or openSUSE, are available online as always:

https://download.suse.com/
https://software.opensuse.org/

--
Good luck.

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