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carnold6
15-Mar-2012, 23:20
SLES10 (not sure of the SP level although i have been told this server set in a closet for 6 years. May not even have a SP installed). I have a folder that is shared and many folders under this top-level share. I have added the users in yast and used SWAT to add smbusers. I can map a winblows drive to said share. The problem is, no one can get to any folders/files under that top-level share. They use gnome. So, i right click the top-level share and click the permissions tab. I give the appropriate permissions and click close. The permissions do not flow down to the folders/files below the top-level share. Isn't there suppose to a box in the permissions tab that you can click that specifies apply to folders/files below? If not, how are you to have the files/folders inherit the permissions?

jmozdzen
18-Mar-2012, 15:10
Hi carnold6,


[...SaMBa share...] I can map a winblows drive to said share. The problem is, no one can get to any folders/files under that top-level share. They use gnome. So, i right click the top-level share and click the permissions tab.

so just that I got things right... "they" use Gnome, *you* use MS Windows. Right? (And then, as a side question - if the users use Gnome, most probably on a Linux platform - why not use NFS in the first place?)


I give the appropriate permissions and click close. The permissions do not flow down to the folders/files below the top-level share. Isn't there suppose to a box in the permissions tab that you can click that specifies apply to folders/files below?

Assuming that this operation is done on a MS Windows client... iirc the check box is in the "advanced" area of that dialogue.


If not, how are you to have the files/folders inherit the permissions?

Via "chmod", "chown" on the server...

The problem might go deeper than the question implies: SaMBa uses user mapping from "SMB users" to "Unix users", so you need to have that setup correctly. And maybe you're using ACL permissions, then it's more than a simple chmod. But your description is a bit vague, so to speak, so only you can tell.

Regards
Jens